Federal Open Market Committee holds interest rates steady

US interest rates remain on hold as the Fed looks for more certainty before signalling a hikeUS interest rates on hold as the Fed looks for certainty

The Federal Open Market Committee (FOMC) made the decision to hold US interest rates steady in July. Market analysts had predicted the hold as the continued threat of economic uncertainty coupled with the upcoming presidential election prevented the Federal Reserve from the announcing a rate hike in the short term. It’s the fifth time the Fed has stuck to its guns since nudging the rate up last December for the first time in nearly a decade. Many believe that it could be the end of the year before a further change is contemplated. Read more…

Are US interest rates set to rise again?

The Federal Reserve looks set to hike US interest rates in the coming monthsThe Federal Reserve looks set to hike US interest rates in the coming months

It seems increasingly likely that the Federal Reserve will impose further interest rate hikes this year, six months after it increased rates for the first time in almost ten years. At the Fed’s review in April, members voted strongly to keep interest rates unchanged, pointing to fears over the sluggish growth of US economy in Q1, Britain’s potential exit from the EU and uncertainty over China. Four hikes were forecast for 2016, but it’s a figure that’s been revised down to two in the light of flat economic conditions globally. Read more…

What’s a Brexit and what would it mean for the US?

How does speculation over Britain’s potential exit from the EU affect the US?British exit from EU could affect US markets

Brexit is a term that may well be unfamiliar to many Americans, although there could be repercussions down the line, should the UK vote to leave the EU in the June referendum. Britain’s prime minister David Cameron has been trying to renegotiate key agreements with the EU to improve its position within the union. But with US interests closely connected to those of the UK and the outcome of the vote far from certain, it’s worth paying attention to proceedings. Read more…

Not-so-happy new year for global markets

Markets in turmoilMarkets in turmoil as World Economic Forum ends

As 2016 gets underway, global markets are already experiencing turmoil. Markets in Europe and the US endured some of their steepest losses for decades in the first few days of the New Year, sparked by fears over continued problems in the Chinese economy where trading was temporarily suspended to try to stem the haemorrhaging yuan. Many markets seem to be edging dangerously close to ‘bear’ territory – indicating a fall of 20% or more from their most recent peak. Read more…

US economic recovery slows

Economic slowdown New figures show the US economy slowed at the end of 2015

Fresh Commerce Department figures show that the US economy slowed significantly in the final three months of 2015 amid signs of a global economic slowdown. Spending by businesses and customers alike was cut and US exports reduced. The disappointing 0.7% growth rate raises concerns about the resilience of the US economy against the backdrop of global stock market turmoil which, in turn, is fed by fears of continued economic slowdown in China and plummeting oil prices. Read more…

What next for the global economy?

Global economy pulling in two directions as Federal Reserve gets ready to raise ratesGlobal economy divided as Federal Reserve gets ready to raise rates

With businesses readying themselves for an interest rate rise in December, the global economy seems to be divided. A slight rise from 0.25% to 0.5% may not seem like a sweeping gesture from the Federal Reserve but it is a game-changer, nevertheless. While Fed boss Janet Yelland feels the US economy can withstand a modest rate rise, some economists are worried that the predicted rise in US interest rates won’t necessarily be the tonic needed to increase the pace of recovery and that the Eurozone, Japan, China and BRIC countries are still far from stable. Read more…